Dave Grohl didn't want to touch a guitar the first four weeks of lockdown

19 May 2020, 17:06 | Updated: 19 May 2020, 17:20

The Foo Fighters rocker has explained why he "backed out of music" at first during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dave Grohl has revealed he wasn't inspired to play music at the start of lockdown.

Like many people all over the world, the Foo Fighters frontman is spending a lot of time at home with his family during the COVID-19 pandemic, and he's explained how it changed his priorities.

Speaking in a new interview with Entertainment Weekly, he said: "... For the first four weeks of this quarantine, I didn’t even have a guitar, I didn’t want to touch a guitar,

"I was so focused on the family and the country and the world and the news that I just kind of backed out of music. And slowly I’m starting to fool around with things again."

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Foo Fighter frontman Dave Grohl at the 62nd Annual GRAMMY Awards&squot;  "Let&squot;s Go Crazy" The GRAMMY Salute To Prince
Foo Fighter frontman Dave Grohl at the 62nd Annual GRAMMY Awards' "Let's Go Crazy" The GRAMMY Salute To Prince. Picture: Emma McIntyre/Getty Images for The Recording Academy

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The Foos rocker recently penned a tribute to live music and shared his hopes for a return to gigs when it's safe to do so.

In an article entitled The Day the Live Concert Returns for The Atlantic's Unchartered series, Grohl began by asking the rhetorical question: "Where were you planning to be on the Fourth of July this year?"

He answered: "I know exactly where I was supposed to be: FedExField, outside Washington, D.C., with my band Foo Fighters and roughly 80,000 of our closest friends. We were going to be celebrating the 25th anniversary of our debut album. A red, white, and blue keg party for the ages, it was primed to be an explosive affair shared by throngs of my sunburned hometown brothers and sisters, singing along to more than a quarter century of Foo.

"Well, things have changed."

Grohl concluded: "I have shared my music, my words, my life with the people who come to our shows. And they have shared their voices with me. Without that audience—that screaming, sweating audience—my songs would only be sound. But together, we are instruments in a sonic cathedral, one that we build together night after night. And one that we will surely build again."

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