The most outrageous claims in rock

10 November 2019, 20:00 | Updated: 11 November 2019, 10:43

Johnny Borrelll in 2006
Johnny Borrelll in 2006. Picture: Titia Hahne / Getty Images

The best rock stars are the ones who keep us entertained with their grandiose claims. But sometimes, musicians go a little too far...

  1. Johnny Borrell on Razorlight's place in history

    Johnny Borrell onstage at V2006 festival
    Johnny Borrell onstage at V2006 festival. Picture: Tom Oldham/Pymca/Shutterstock

    "I'm the best songwriter of my generation," Borrell told the NME in 2004. "Ask me in 20 years about The Libertines.

    Well, they're still here 15 years later... how are Razorlight doing?

  2. Suede's Brett Anderson on sexuality

    Brett Anderson performing at the BRIT Awards in 1993
    Brett Anderson performing at the BRIT Awards in 1993. Picture: Richard Young/Shutterstock

    "I’m a bisexual man who’s never had a homosexual experience," said the Suede frontman in a 1992 music press interview.

    This proclamation prompted Brian Molko to write the Placebo classic Nancy Boy.

  3. John Lennon on The Beatles' popularity

    The Beatles at a press conference in August 1966
    The Beatles at a press conference in August 1966. Picture: AP/Shutterstock

    “We’re more popular than Jesus now. I don’t know which will go first - rock ‘n’ roll or Christianity.” said John in one of the most famous boasts in rock history.

    Famous because it led to record burnings and a telling-off from the Pope. The band scraped through one last US tour in 1966 then put a stop to playing live.

  4. Noel Gallagher on Oasis

    Noel Gallagher in 1997
    Noel Gallagher in 1997. Picture: Pat Pope/Shutterstock

    "We're not arrogant, we just believe we're the best band in the world."

    Indeed.

  5. Sid Vicious on his public

    Sid Vicious in 1977
    Sid Vicious in 1977. Picture: Richard Young/Shutterstock

    In his Sex Pistols heyday, the punk icon was asked if he made his music with the man in the street in mind. He replied:

    "No, I've met the man in the street. He's a c**t."

  6. David Bowie praising Hitler

    David Bowie in Helsinki in 1976
    David Bowie in Helsinki in 1976. Picture: Jarmo Hietaranta/Shutterstock

    "Rock stars are fascists, too. Adolf Hitler was one of the first rock stars.”

    David Bowie caused controversy in September 1976 when he told Playboy magazine that the Nazi leader and architect of the Holocaust was "quite as good as [Mick] Jagger." He went on: "Look at some of his films and see how he moved. It’s astounding. And, boy, when he hit that stage, he worked an audience." This was during Bowie's coked up "Thin White Duke" period and this interview, plus a photo in which he appeared to be giving a Nazi salute when arriving at Victoria station in London, meant that it took years for the superstar to shake off accusations that he was a facist sympathiser.

  7. Serge Pizzorno on saving dance music

    Serge Pizzorno of Kasabian in 2006
    Serge Pizzorno of Kasabian in 2006. Picture: Hugh Thompson/Shutterstock

    “Dance music was on its arse before we came along."

    This is what the Kasabian guitarist claimed in 2006.

  8. Brandon Flowers on Sam's Town

    The Killers in Italy in 2006: Mark Stoermer, Ronnie Vannucci, Brandon Flowers and David Keuning
    The Killers in Italy in 2006: Mark Stoermer, Ronnie Vannucci, Brandon Flowers and David Keuning. Picture: Alessia Laudoni/Shutterstock

    "This album is one of the best albums in the past 20 years," the Killers frontman told MTV in 2006.

    Having seen off The Bravery for apparently being Killers copyists, Brandon's confidence was clearly riding high.

  9. Julian Casablancas on his legacy

    The Strokes in 2006:
    The Strokes in 2006:. Picture: Henny Ray Abrams/AP/Shutterstock

    "I want to be one of those people, be they writers, poets, musicians, who leaves clues for the next generation."

    So said the Strokes man in 2001 at the outset of his career. "The really good people leave clues that help feed the human race." Have you had enough yet?

  10. Yoko Ono on Ringo Starr

    Yoko Ono, John Lennon and Ringo Starr at the Roxy Theatre, Los Angeles, 1976
    Yoko Ono, John Lennon and Ringo Starr at the Roxy Theatre, Los Angeles, 1976. Picture: Brad Elterman/Shutterstock

    "No one is probably going to believe it but he was the most influential Beatle."

    Yoko told Rolling Stone this surprising news in 2015. Hmmm.

  11. Tre Cool on being Green Day's drummer

    Green Day in 2010: Mike Dirnt, Billie Joe Armstrong and Tre Cool
    Green Day in 2010: Mike Dirnt, Billie Joe Armstrong and Tre Cool. Picture: Harold Escalona/EPA/Shutterstock

    "I'm the greatest rock and roll drummer on the planet and you suck."

  12. Axl Rose on the benefits of being a rock star

    Axl Rose of Guns N'Roses in 2017
    Axl Rose of Guns N'Roses in 2017. Picture: Agencia Efe/Shutterstock

    "I have a zoo," the Guns N'Roses frontman told Jimmy Fallon in 2012.