John Lennon's killer denied parole for the eleventh time

27 August 2020, 12:12 | Updated: 27 August 2020, 12:14

John Lennon outside his home in New York, August 1980
John Lennon outside his home in New York, August 1980. Picture: Vinnie Zuffante/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Mark David Chapman - who murdered the former Beatle in December 1980 - will spend at least another two years behind bars.

John Lennon's killer Mark David Chapman has been denied parole for the eleventh time.

The 65-year-old - who shot the Beatles legend outside his Manhattan apartment in December 1980 - is now set to spend at least another two years behind bars for the murder, having lost his latest bid for freedom.

Chapman was originally sentenced to a prison term of 20 years to life. He shot Lennon four times in the back as the star was entering his home at the Dakota Building in New York on the evening of 8 December 1980. Lennon's wife Yoko Ono witnessed the shooting. Whe Beatles legend was pronounced dead on arrival at hospital.

Chapman is currently serving his sentence at Wende Correctional Facility in New York, and the New York State Board of Parole has confirmed that his latest parole application was denied following an interview on 19 August.

Mark Chapman on the night he killed John Lennon, December 1980
Mark Chapman on the night he killed John Lennon, December 1980. Picture: Bureau of Prisons/Getty Images

He was first eligible for parole 20 years after the crime took place in 2000. However, his applications have been persistently rejected - he's next scheduled to appear before the board in 2022.

Chapman previously confessed to feeling "more and more" shame every year about killing the 40-year-old former Beatle.

After making his tenth unsuccessful bid for parole in August 2018, a transcript of the hearing was released by New York prison officials.

He said: "Thirty years ago I couldn't say I felt shame and I know what shame is now.

"It's where you cover your face, you don't want to, you know, ask for anything."

Chapman also admitted he went through an internal "tug of war" about whether or not to go ahead with his shooting plan after he had already met Lennon earler in the day. The Beatle had signed Chapman's copy of his latest album Double Fantasy.

Recalling his state of mind on the day of the shooting, Chapman added: "I do remember having the thought of, 'Hey, you have got the album now. Look at this, he signed it, just go home.' But there was no way I was just going to go home."

Paul McCartney attends the "March For Our Lives" protest against gun violence in the country on March 24, 2018 in New York,
Paul McCartney attends the "March For Our Lives" protest against gun violence in the country on March 24, 2018 in New York,. Picture: Atilgan Ozdil/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

In March 2018, Sir Paul McCartney joined a march in New York campaigning for stricter gun control laws in the US. He said: "One of my best friends was killed in gun violence right around here, so it’s important to me."