Paul McCartney isn't sure Glastonbury can take place in 2021

18 December 2020, 16:50 | Updated: 18 December 2020, 18:18

Paul McCartney Performs At The O2 Arena in 2018
Paul McCartney is unsure Glastonbury can take place in 2021. Picture: Jim Dyson/Getty Images

The Beatles legend was set to headline the festival in 2020, but isn't sure if it can go ahead as planned next year.

Paul McCartney isn't sure if Glastonbury Festival can take place in 2021 due to the coronavirus pandemic.

The legendary Beatles star was due to headline the festival in 2020 and has shared his hopes for getting out on the road again.

However, though he's marvelled at the ways performers and artists have worked around restrictions with live streamed performances and socially distanced gigs, the legend isn't sure something as large as Glastonbury could take place.

"People have started to find ways with Zoom and with socially distanced things,' he told The Sun. "But for a thing like Glastonbury where you’ve got over 100,000 people packed into a field, that’s a super-spreader you know."

This year, the Pyramid Stage was set to be headlined by McCartney and first time festival performers Taylor Swift and Kendrick Lamar.

It is yet to be confirmed if the headliners will be moved to 2021, but all ticket holders for 2020 were able to roll on their tickets to next year.

READ MORE: What did Paul McCartney play at Glastonbury 2004?

Macca might not be sure if the world-renowned Somerset festival will be able to take place next June, but he's under no doubt when it comes to whether he will take the coronavirus vaccine.

"I know we’ll come through this," the Yesterday singer said. “It is great news about the vaccine. I’ll have it as soon as I’m allowed.

"I’m a grandad and you don’t want grandad to collapse. You’ve got to stay strong, that’s all you can do, or you go under."

McCartney - who is married to his third wife Nancy Shevell - spent much of lockdown in the UK with his daughter Mary and her family, and he was "a little worried" about telling people he'd been enjoying isolation because so many had found things tough.

He revealed: "A lot of friends were saying, ‘Wow, I’ve never spent so much time with my wife!’

“And it was great because I got to spend time with my daughter Mary and her family. So that meant I had four of my grandkids together, which was really nice.

"Great family, very loving and we’re in the countryside so, if we went out to get a breath of fresh air, we didn’t meet anyone.

“I was a little worried about telling anyone I was having a good time because I knew so many people weren’t but most people I talked to said, ‘Oh yeah, there’s a silver lining’.”

READ MORE: Yoko Ono, Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr lead tributes to John Lennon on 40th anniversary of his murder