The best Eighth Albums ever released

15 November 2018, 04:30 | Updated: 15 November 2018, 04:31

Mick Jagger, Michael Stipe, Anthony Kiedis, Robert Smith and Dave Gahan
Mick Jagger, Michael Stipe, Anthony Kiedis, Robert Smith and Dave Gahan. Picture: Larry Busacca/M. Caulfield/WireImage/Anthony Pidgeon/Redferns/Michel Linssen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Muse’s Simulation Theory is their eight album and some bands just get better as their career progresses. Who else has triumphed eighth time around?

  1. The Beatles - Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band

    The Fab Four recorded so many albums in those days, this was their eighth outing in four years. And this 1967 classic basically redefined what the pop album meant, from its fantasy title track to the stunning finale of A Day In The Life.

    The Beatles - Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band
    The Beatles - Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. Picture: Press
  2. R.E.M. - Automatic For The People

    The US band’s third album for major label Warner Bros was their eighth in total, and their biggest release ever, having sold over 18 million copies in its lifetime. Surprisingly dark for R.E.M., it flits between the serious political sounds of Drive to the more personal reminiscences of Everybody Hurts, but still has time for a laugh with The Sidewinder Sleeps Tonite.

    R.E.M. - Automatic For The People
    R.E.M. - Automatic For The People. Picture: Press
  3. The Rolling Stones - Let It Bleed

    The late 60s looked pretty grim for the Stones, with drugs, death and prison all coming into view for the legendary band. However, their 1968 LP Beggars’ Banquet was a huge return to form and they forged the country rock genre with its follow-up, Let It Bleed. The album was released just as the band headed back out on the road for the first time in years.

    The Rolling Stones - Let It Bleed
    The Rolling Stones - Let It Bleed. Picture: Press
  4. The Cure - Disintegration

    1987’s Kiss Me Kiss Me Kiss Me was a worldwide hit, making Robert Smith and co into the biggest alternative rock band in Europe. This 1989 follow-up horrified the record company, being a downbeat study of hitting 30, getting old and, basically, dying. But it was an even bigger hit which saw The Cure play stadium shows in the US.

    The Cure - Disintegration
    The Cure - Disintegration. Picture: Press
  5. Red Hot Chili Peppers - By The Way

    The band released their eighth album in 2002 and it was a stormer, featuring Can't Stop, The Zephyr Song and the title track. Pretty good.

    Red Hot Chili Peppers - By The Way
    Red Hot Chili Peppers - By The Way. Picture: Press
  6. Depeche Mode - Songs Of Faith And Devotion

    1990’s Violator was a huge worldwide hit for the Mode, but the follow-up three years later raised a few eyebrows by embracing guitars instead of the band’s traditional electronics. Singer Dave Gahan got grungy and it almost cost him his life (thanks to some personal demons encountered on the road), but the LP confirmed Depeche Mode as one of the world’s biggest live acts.

    Depeche Mode - Songs Of Faith And Devotion
    Depeche Mode - Songs Of Faith And Devotion. Picture: Press
  7. Kraftwerk - Computer World

    When you’re ahead of the game for so long, how do you keep your music cutting edge? Having pioneered electronica in the early 1970s, German legends Kraftwerk nailed the synthpop template in ’81 with this impeccable album of sequenced classics. The slick electronic sounds found a home i the New Romantic clubs of the time, and the record set the template for the wave of house music that followed.

    Kraftwerk - Computer World
    Kraftwerk - Computer World. Picture: Press
  8. Pink Floyd - Dark Side Of The Moon

    The Floyd had been around the block a few times before they hit gold with this emotional musing on life and love. Having lost original lead singer Syd Barrett and gained guitarist David Gilmour, this quickly became one of the biggest selling albums in history, Not bad for an eighth album.

    Pink Floyd - Dark Side Of The Moon
    Pink Floyd - Dark Side Of The Moon. Picture: Press
  9. U2 - Zooropa

    1991’s Achtung Baby was experimental for the Irish band, but this follow-up was even more interesting. Largely written and recorded on the road during the massive Zoo TV tour, it’s about as far away from the epic sound of The Joshua Tree as you can imagine.

    U2 - Zooropa
    U2 - Zooropa. Picture: Press