The Streets' Albums Ranked

25 April 2018, 12:09

The Streets albums
The Streets albums. Picture: Artwork

To celebrate The Streets re-issuing their first two albums on double vinyl next month, we list their five studio releases from worst to best.

  1. Everything Is Borrowed

    The Streets - Everything Is Borrowed
    The Streets - Everything Is Borrowed . Picture: Press

    Their 2008 album, which Mike Skinner describes as a "peaceful coming to terms" LP, was his reaction to the "guilt-ridden indulgence" of its The Hardest Way to Make an Easy Living predecessor.

    As a result, you get less punch and more chill, but tracks like The Escapist still remain memorable.

  2. Computers and Blues

    The Streets - Computers and Blues
    The Streets - Computers and Blues. Picture: Press

    Their final album, which was released in 2011 includes guest spots from the likes of Claire Maguire and Rob Harvey of The Music, who provide highlights in the likes of Lock the Locks and Going Through Hell respectively.

  3. The Hardest Way To Make An Easy Living

    The Streets - The Hardest Way to Make An Easy Living
    The Streets - The Hardest Way to Make An Easy Living. Picture: Artwork

    Coincidentally, their third studio album places third on our list.

    Their shortest album thus far at only 37 minutes and 12 seconds long, The Hardest Way To Make an Easy Living received mixed reviews from the critics, with some thinking Skinner's ideas and delivery a little half-baked.

    However, it still boasted memorable singles in When You Wasn't Famous, Never Went To Church and Prangin' Out. And if you haven't heard Pete Doherty's version of pranging out, we suggest you listen to it here.

  4. A Grand Don’t Come for Free

    The Streets - A Grand Don't Come for Free
    The Streets - A Grand Don't Come for Free. Picture: Artwork

    A Grand Don't Come For Free is The Streets' most successful album, peaking at No.1 in the UK chart and becoming an era-defining record in the process.

    Both a commercial and critical success, singles in Fit But You Know It and Dry Your Eyes cemented Skinner's status as a baird of the everyday, working-class male.

  5. Original Pirate Material

    The Streets - Original Pirate Material
    The Streets - Original Pirate Material. Picture: Artwork

    Let's be honest. It was always going to be a toss up between this and A Grande Don't Come For Free. But for us, The Streets' debut is well up there with some of the best albums of the noughties.

    Not only did it bring another dimension to the UK garage scene, but it drew on elements of hip-hop and dubstep while describing a uniquely British experience and making Mike Skinner a vital voice in music.

Watch your night out sponsored by The Streets here: