Normal People’s Paul Mescal stars in The Rolling Stones’ Scarlet video

7 August 2020, 10:45 | Updated: 7 August 2020, 11:08

See the Irish actor star in the video for The Rolling Stones' Scarlet, which features Led Zeppelin's Jimmy Paige.

Paul Mescal has starred in The Rolling Stones' Scarlet video.

The Normal People actor - who's known for playing the brooding Connell in the hit adaptation - has literally shaken off the role of the shy protagonist to star in Mick Jagger and co's latest visuals.

The socially-distanced video, which was helmed by directing duo Us, sees the Emmy-nominated actor thrust his hips and dance around a suite at London's iconic Claridge’s hotel.

Watch the rising star feature in the video above.

READ MORE: The Rolling Stones & more sign open letter demanding clearance for political campaign music

Paul Mescal stars in The Rolling Stones' Scarlet video
Paul Mescal stars in The Rolling Stones' Scarlet video. Picture: Press/Edward Cooke

READ MORE: The story behind The Rolling Stones' name

Scarlet, the previously unheard Stones track featuring Jimmy Page and Rick Grech was released on 22 July and will be included on the box set and deluxe CD and vinyl editions of the forthcoming multi-format release of 1973 classic Goats Head Soup.

It features alongside two previously unreleased tracks All The Rage and Criss Cross, plus many more rarities, outtakes and alternative mixes.

Goats Head Soup, which will be restored to its full glory and more, will be released by Universal Music in multi-format and deluxe editions on 4 September.

Pre-order the album here.

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